Articles

January 28

Emotions Are Important, But Not So Much

Posted by William Berry | Filed under Articles | No Comments

Artwork by William Berry and Alexi Berry Artwork by William Berry and Alexi Berry

Emotions drive us, perhaps more than we would like to admit. In fact, the philosopher Hume postulated that we are more influenced by our feelings than by reason. We may not even be aware of how much our emotions influence us. But if one can accept that emotions play an unconscious role and would like to make more rational decisions and decrease the impact of emotion, this post may help.

Read the rest here. 

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December 28

Aligning the Machinery of Your Mind

Posted by William Berry | Filed under Articles | No Comments

Art by Alexi Berry Art by Alexi Berry

In the last few months the idea of autonomy has come to the forefront of conversation in my classes. One course had a chapter on adolescent autonomy. Another class debated whether there is freewill, or if all choices are a result of conditioning. While preparing to write this a podcast I listen to regularly had a segment about the non-existence of freewill. My philosophy on the topic is free-will and autonomy do exist, but the vast majority of people, the vast majority of the time, act without it.

Read the rest here.

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November 28

Mindful Social Media Use

Posted by William Berry | Filed under Articles | No Comments

Photo by Alexi Berry Photo by Alexi Berry

Over six years ago, the focus of one of my blog posts was the effect of social media on mental health (Facebook: Demon or Savior). Recently, in listening to a podcast the topic again became relevant, and this post will revisit the phenomenon of social media and its effects.

In a search of periodicals for titles related to social media and its effects, the vast majority focused on detrimental effects to well-being (Brooks, S., (2015), achievement (Ali Aljabry, A. M., et.al., 2017), family life (ÜNAL, S. 2018), and social life (Ali Aljabry, A. M., et.al., 2017). Some focused on how to harness the …

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November 13

I Don’t Want to Put My Thumb on the Scale

Posted by William Berry | Filed under Articles | No Comments

IMG_6559

This is my latest for PT. Read it here. 

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September 20

Change Your Philosophy

Posted by William Berry | Filed under Articles | No Comments

Screen Shot 2018-11-13 at 9.38.50 PM

 

This is my latest post for PT. Read it here. 

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August 19

Psychology is My Religion

Posted by William Berry | Filed under Articles | No Comments

psychology-religion Photo credit Alexi Berry

This is my latest for PT. Read it here.

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August 6

Everything is Easier on Paper

Posted by William Berry | Filed under Articles | No Comments

easier on paper
The title might seem commonsensical, but it is rare that people remember it when they are judging themselves harshly. Since I put a lot of words on paper (this is my 108th post), I think it is time to explicitly state that practicing anything is more difficult than it seems in one’s head.

Continue reading, Everything is Easier on Paper here.

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June 19

Recovery for Everyone

Posted by William Berry | Filed under Articles | No Comments

Photo credit Alexi Berry Photo credit Alexi Berry

Over twenty-five years ago I started in the counseling field, working in a substance abusetreatment center. The Recovery Model was commonplace in addiction treatment. It was not called that, it was simply how addiction treatment was. One of the treatment centers I worked at had a poster called, “The Twelve Steps for Everyone”. It generalized the 12-Steps of AA, NA, and other 12-step meetings, suggesting everyone can benefit. The point I’m fumbling with here follows that example: The Recovery Model, now commonplace in the treatment of mental …

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May 20

Top 20 Ways You Are Lying to Yourself

Posted by William Berry | Filed under Articles | No Comments

Photo Credit Alexi Berry Photo Credit Alexi Berry

I often write about how we humans deceive ourselves. Much of the time I’ll list a few ways that relate particularly to whatever I am writing about. Often, I am asking the reader to take a leap of faith and trust that psychology has demonstrated self-delusion based on a few examples. For this post, I have compiled some of my favorite ways the unconscious affects behavior without awareness. Continue reading here.

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April 19

Incentivizing Lying

Posted by William Berry | Filed under Articles | No Comments

 

I write a good deal about self-deception. This post, however, will focus on the deception of others. Most people abhor deception. Yet, to some extent, everyone does it. A study indicated most subjects lied on average one or two times a day (Bhattacharjee, Y., 2017). It seems dishonesty has become more prevalent, and perhaps more tolerated.

 

Nine years ago I wrote on my personal blog about dishonesty (Dishonesty and “I Love You Man”). I had recently caught two students cheating on an exam. It was the first time that had happened (I had only been teaching a year or so at the time). In the time since, …

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