Reviews

November 13

Review: Becoming Myself

Posted by William Berry | Filed under Reviews | No Comments

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First, let me explain the picture. Usually I just get the stock photo of the book cover from the web. But for this book I took. Picture of the book, along with other Yalom authored books I own (and there are at least two others I read but can’t find, likely because I lent them, “On the Couch” and “The Gift of Therapy”). In addition to my collection of Yalom books, there is a mug visible on the shelf given to me by someone I mentor. It’s there because of its direction to be more like me you need to do several things, one of which is, “Read and Breathe Yalom”. …

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August 6

Review: The Denial of Death

Posted by William Berry | Filed under Reviews | No Comments

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Ernest Becker’s Pulitzer Prize winning work, “The Denial of Death” kept creeping into my life. I’d see references to it and quotes from it. I decided, as an existentialist, I had to read it.

I absolutely loved the beginning of the book. And by “the beginning” I mean at least the first part. Part 1, “The Depth Psychology of Heroism”, encompasses the first 93 pages of the book and lays out his theory. I love how Becker exalts Freud for his recognition of our ceatureliness (sex and aggression as our main drives) but points out how he came up short in his theory, ignoring our fear of death, perhaps because of his …

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April 9

Review: Against the Stream

Posted by William Berry | Filed under Reviews | No Comments

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A good while ago a former student recommended this book to me. I logged it in the back of my mind, but have been into Brad Warner’s writing of late. (He is another Buddhist author). I thought I had finished all of Warner’s books, and purchased it. It sat on my shelf with other books I purchased and intend to read for a couple of months. Then a few clients and colleagues, in an act of interesting synchronicity, started talking about Refuge Recovery. (Refuge Recovery is a program of Buddhist based addiction recovery meetings). I went to their website, and low and behold, the founder is Noah Levine, the author of …

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March 1

Review- There is No God, And He is Always With You

Posted by William Berry | Filed under Reviews | No Comments

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Looking at the dates on Goodreads, it may appear it took me over a year to read this book. I guess that’s true. But, to be clear, I started it, shelved it to read other, harder texts, and to savor it. I’ve read nearly all of his other books, and don’t see much sense in going backwards to his second (which he’s referenced numerous times in his other books, to the point I feel I’ve gotten the point of it). Anyhow, excuses, excuses.

I really did want to savor it. I loved this book, as I’ve loved his others. I got about half way through it before shelving it to put more …

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January 13

Review- The Eden Project: In Search of the Magical Other

Posted by William Berry | Filed under Reviews | No Comments

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Like most other books I’ve read this year, this took me longer to read than it should have. The book isn’t long, and it’s interesting enough to get through in a short period of time. I definitely enjoyed the book, quoting the author (and others the author quoted) multiple times while reading it.

The book explains the some of the Jungian theory of romantic relationships, specifically how we project onto our beloved and additionally expect them to save us: from death, from the hardships of life, from ourselves.

I remember being awestruck by the book, “We” by Robert Johnson, many years ago. I felt it removed some of the illusion of romantic love, …

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December 25

Existential Psychotherapy

Posted by William Berry | Filed under Reviews | No Comments

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It’s been more than 6 months since I reviewed a book. And this book had been shelved for 7 months, in favor of other reading. The truth is, the size is intimidating. Four-hundred and eighty-six pages. A friend recently told me she bought it on my recommendation, but hasn’t begun it as it is intimidating.

That gives away the review. I loved the book. I was recommending it before I finished it, which I took my time with to savor. I enjoyed reading it immensely. This despite the fact it challenged some of my well-established beliefs. There are also a couple of things I thought a stretch, as the author (my favorite …

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May 6

Review- Modern Romance

Posted by William Berry | Filed under Reviews | No Comments

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I bought this book on the recommendation of my daughter. I want to begin by saying I’m not a big fan of Aziz Ansari. I did watch his show, “Master of None” on Netflix, and thought it was good. But even with that, I can take him or leave him.

With that said, I loved the book. As most of you know, I struggle with relationships. I struggle even more dating. While being single or somewhat single for the better part of a year, maybe I hoped the book would help. I don’t think it helped me. It did, however, explain some things in psychological terms that increased my understanding, and as …

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May 2

Review-What Every Body Is Saying

Posted by William Berry | Filed under Reviews | No Comments

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I read this book because someone I know talked about it, and it sounded interesting. I already know a good amount about body language, being a therapist and having taught Interpersonal Communication. But there is always more to learn.

I didn’t love the book. The most common thing I said when talking about the book was that I felt my 12-year-old could read it. It bored me a good deal. Additionally, I felt all the scenarios, especially in the beginning, where a bit self-aggrandizing. This was a bit of a turn-off for me, but at the same time the author is a respected teacher of reading body language. I wondered how else …

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March 9

Review- The Subtle Art of Not Giving a Fuck

Posted by William Berry | Filed under Reviews | No Comments

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I bought this book on the recommendation of a close friend. She said it sounded like my philosophy, and that I might like it. She knows me really well, so I trusted her judgement. I loved the title, and went to get it at a bookstore within a day or two. I paid over $25 for it, as they only had hardcover. But my need for immediate gratification, despite reading 5 other books currently, had to be satisfied.

I read the book in about three or four sittings. I read over 60 pages the first night I got it. I put quotes from the first chapter on my business Facebook page. That …

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January 1

Review-Acceptance, Mindfulness, and the Psychodynamic Revolution

Posted by William Berry | Filed under Reviews | No Comments

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“Acceptance, Mindfulness, and the Psychodynamic Evolution” was given to me by the publisher to review. I used this book more times than I can count (at least 8!), in presentations, Psychology Today posts, and other writing. It has proven very valuable to me in this regard.

The book is a compilation (edited) of writings on how psychodynamic therapy is currently, and always has, used aspects of acceptance and mindfulness in its approach to therapy. Acceptance and mindfulness are relatively new, and fashionable, approaches to psychotherapy. I’ve been an advocate for years, having read a good deal on eastern philosophy and using both aspects to improve my perception and life overall.

The writers argue, …

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